Michael Moore: ‘We Are All Wisconsinites Now’

This is a great speech. Awesome, worth listening to. I seriously doubt this will be seen on TV (unless it’s MSNBC). Michael Moore denounces the “financial coup d’etat” by Wall Street, then schools the Tea-GOP on Economics 101. “The rich have overplayed their hand,” he concludes. “It’s one person, one vote, and there are a hell of a lot more of us than there are of them!”

Synopsis from Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Madison – “America is not broke,” filmmaker Michael Moore declared in a speech to pro-labor demonstrators Saturday at the state Capitol.

“The country is awash in wealth and cash,” he said. “It’s just not in your hands.”

He said wealth has been transferred “in the greatest heist in history” from the workers to the bankers and the super-rich.

“Wall Street, the banks and the Fortune 500 now run this Republic,” he said.

Moore called Gov. Scott Walker “your soon to be ex-Governor.”

He added that there have been three major lies over the last decade:

“Wisconsin is broke. There are weapons of mass destruction in Iraq. And the Packers need (Brett) Favre to win the Super Bowl.”

Moore said people in Wisconsin “have aroused a sleeping giant, known as the working people.”

“Right now, the earth is shaking and the ground is shifting under the feet of those who are in charge,” he said. “Your message has inspired people in all 50 states: ‘We have had it.’ ”

“We are all Wisconsinites now,” he said. “We are rich with ideas and talent and hard work and love, yes love.”

“For three weeks you have stood in the cold, sat on the floor, skipped out of town to Illinois, whatever it took you’ve done it,” he said. “What is certain, Madison is only the beginning.”

BTW, the inflatable palm trees are a taunt directed at Faux News Channel’s lies about “union thugs.”

UPDATE: Michael Moore: The Smug Wealthy Have Gone Too Far — And We’re Finally Fighting Back

UPDATE: If Banks Paid Their Full Taxes, We Could Rehire All 132,000 Teachers Laid Off During The Recession — Twice

UPDATE: Sam Baldwin: Plutocracy Now: What Wisconsin Is Really About

  1. #1 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 4:55 pm

    No comments?

  2. #2 by Evidence on March 6, 2011 - 5:51 pm

    The rich? Michael Moore is the rich. I lover how the oligarchy has these phony hollywood man of the people shills all set to make the effort look good before the axe falls.

    Moore is one of “them”. Wouldn’t use union employees on his last “film”.

    http://www.chicagonow.com/blogs/publius-forum/2011/03/michael-moore-big-fat-union-hypocrite.html

  3. #3 by Richard Warnick on March 6, 2011 - 6:26 pm

    Did anyone watch “60 Minutes” tonight?

    A family who lost both jobs and a house, fell out of the middle class and had to live in their van in a Wal-Mart parking lot. Until the van was repossessed.

    Children in Florida told Scott Pelley what it feels like to go hungry. And the worst part is the shame they feel for something that is not their fault. Wall Street did this.

  4. #4 by Richard Warnick on March 6, 2011 - 6:43 pm

    Glenn–

    You link to a blog that has no credibility. There are no “Wisconsin union thugs rampaging across the state.” That’s what the inflatable palm trees are all about! Faux News once again lived down to its reputation for flat-out lying.

    The stagehands union has nothing but good things to say about Michael Moore, and they are supporting the Wisconsin protests.

  5. #5 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 6:50 pm

    Come-on Richard,

    These loosers had a chance to make a thousand million dollars and they passed it up.

  6. #6 by Richard Warnick on March 6, 2011 - 6:53 pm

    I think the latest term to describe the middle class is “slobs.” We’re all “slobs” according to the Tea-GOP. And proud of it, too!

  7. #7 by brewski on March 6, 2011 - 7:35 pm

    Richard,
    Michael Moore flies around in private jets, stays at the Ritz Carlton, hires non-union and lily white fil crews, buys shares of big bad oil companies stock, and you don’t believe it unless Maddow tells you so?
    http://abcnews.go.com/Business/michael-moore-snubs-union-workers-making-capitalism-love/story?id=8715559

  8. #8 by Richard Warnick on March 6, 2011 - 8:13 pm

    I searched the stagehand union’s main website, and some of the locals. They have nothing bad to say about Michael Moore. They support the Wisconsin protests.

    I don’t know anything about private jets, the Ritz Carlton, etc. What I do know is what Michael Moore says is true– something you are not even trying to address.

  9. #9 by cav on March 6, 2011 - 8:26 pm

    I was a slob long before it became fashionable, but if you want to know what would really irk me? Try likening me to walker, bush or that sort.

    No prob with slob.

  10. #10 by james farmer on March 6, 2011 - 9:08 pm

    Michael Moore flies around in private jets, stays at the Ritz Carlton, hires non-union and lily white fil crews, buys shares of big bad oil companies stock ….

    So what?? If I had his money, I would do the same thing AND, so would you, BREW!!!

  11. #11 by cav on March 6, 2011 - 9:54 pm

    We’re all Wisconsinites now, Pennsylvanians, tomorrow, Ohioans the day after, and on and on.

    But it should be remembered there have been actions countering oppressors for as long as anyone can remember. So buck up and keep on keeping on. Who knows we might inadvertantly corral them on one of their stripped off mountain tops or polluted waste lands – wouldn’t that be justice!?

  12. #12 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 9:54 pm

    “At this time, IATSE has no comment on the Michael Moore film,” said IATSE publicist Katherine Orloff.

    An organized labor source confirmed Moore and the union were in talks, even though the movie is completed and slated for release on Friday, Oct. 2.

    Moore’s admittedly left-leaning and darkly satiric films have long enraged conservatives, who have closely examined the director’s expenses and business practices looking for signs of hypocrisy.

    In other words..

    Radical right wing advocates used latex gloves to probe Michael Moore’s rear end in hopes of finding a particle of something they could reveal, and couldn’t find it.

    In other other words..

    “Citizens United” films smell like a silent but deadly fart, but Michael Moore’s films don’t.

  13. #13 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 10:16 pm

    cav:

    You’re going to have to stop commenting at the exact same time as me!

    I need the input beforehand.

    GOT IT?

  14. #14 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 10:27 pm

    I guess what I meant to say is that Michael Moore’s films are loud and satisfying.

  15. #15 by cav on March 6, 2011 - 10:28 pm

    Ok, I’ll take the morning shift.

    I find your admonitions unsettling, but since mine posted first, I suppose you owe me a beverage of some sort.

    I’ll call you to make arrangements.

  16. #16 by Larry Bergan on March 6, 2011 - 10:59 pm

    Emphasis mine:

    I find your admonitions unsettling, but since mine posted first, I suppose you owe me a beverage of some sort.

    PROVE IT!

  17. #17 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 6:14 am

    James,
    Then you would be a hypocrite too, just like he is. I guess all your liberal principles about global warming only count as long as you can’t afford to have the personal carbon footprint of a small country. Thank you for confirming my point.

    Richard,
    Looking for criticism of Moore on the official union websites is like looking for NOW officially calling Slick Willy a misogynist. You’re not going to find it for other reasons, but that doesn’t make it less true.

    You are also not going to find anything on the union websites about Nancy Pelosi’s wineries and resorts being 100% non-union and not paying living wages and benefits to her employees. That doesn’t make it not true.

    They know which side of their political bread is butttered.

  18. #18 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 7:28 am

    brewski–

    You’re trying to make Michael Moore the issue (even though your information is unreliable). Weli, if you listened to Moore’s speech you know it’s not about him.

    The issue is the Tea-GOP war on the middle class. What have you got to say about that?

  19. #19 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 7:33 am

    This is laughable the left wing sham side of the duopoly oligarchy has the progressive segment of the dumbass populace completely buffalloed. I hope at this time given the evidence it will somehow seep into ardent progressive flinty capped skulls that these people who you claim to champion your social causes are actually part and parcel of the whole oligarchy that sells you down the river and aids in repressing you.

    It would be funny if it were not so sad. Volunteering for stupidity is not the same as being stupid. Money colors what is to happen, there is none for public employees, and their holding out for it at tax payer expense is not going to endear them to folks without their quite complete benefit packages. When the time comes for people to be fed up, they will be liquidated quickly and without remorse.

  20. #20 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 7:35 am

    Public government employees are not the middle class, read FDR’s statements on their obligations and how they are not like other employees. All this whining is going to result in an ass whipping and then going to bed with no supper for these folks.

  21. #21 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 7:38 am

    Glenn–

    Some middle-class workers have negotiated semi-decent benefits. To get them and keep them they had to give up salary increases for at least a decade. Other middle class workers just went without a raise and got nothing in exchange.

    Your solution is to take away the benefits from those who have them. Why not extend benefits to everybody?

  22. #22 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 7:48 am

    Richard, who ponied up 700 billion to the banks? That would be the lost Democrat comgress and the bubble blower in chief. Progressives are so lost in this new wilderness, and are reacting in old ways that have no bearing or merit in the situation at hand. IT’s the amazing disappearing progressive wing of the Democrat party, come one, come all, and have glimpse of it before it goes extinct.

    Admission is free.

  23. #23 by cav on March 7, 2011 - 7:55 am

    Larry: Why you little….get off a my lawn er I’ll…

    brew – MM’s full disclosure: I am a proud union member of four unions: the Directors Guild, the Writers Guild, the Screen Actors Guild and AFTRA (the last two have passed resolutions supporting the workers in Wisconsin). My production company has signed union contracts with five unions (and soon to be a 6th). All my full-time employees have full medical and dental insurance with NO DEDUCTIBLE. So, yes, I’m biased.

    Evi’: Try to keep in mind the references are, for the most part, about Planet Earth, and its populace.

    Richard: Again, spot on (I have to let my inner cheer-leader out somewhere, don’t I).

    I remember being led along with the notion we’d all have the same health care as the congress. How soon we forget. In my case alone this would probably equate to part of the fastening hardware on the shipping container of one small cluster bomb. But you know I’m a whiner by virtue of my leftishness, so I don’t count.

  24. #24 by cav on March 7, 2011 - 8:07 am

    Evi: I may have to step that back a bit:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_N2PXdq_bWE

    We are clearly only a small part of a much grander system.

  25. #25 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 8:08 am

    It is “just the beginning” fat man, of the end.

    http://www.mooreexposed.com/

  26. #26 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 8:30 am

    Think that tongue that flew about 10 million miles off the sun might, just maybe could cause a swash of heat that impacts our Earth in say what 8 odd minutes? With sights like this so obvious and recordable, AGW hogwash is going to bake in the Sun’s grandiosity.

  27. #27 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 8:50 am

    Richard,
    The first two words of the title of your top post were “Michael Moore”, and yet you accuse me of trying to make this about “MIchael Moore”.

    You get funnier every day.

  28. #28 by Uncle Rico on March 7, 2011 - 9:45 am

    I’m starting a new organization: Hypocrites against Hypocrisy. It is open to all who despise hypocrisy yet selectively confront it for political or other reasons and thus fail to live up to the ideological purity of their stated beliefs. Ground floor opportunities now available. Inquire within.

  29. #29 by cav on March 7, 2011 - 10:06 am

    Evi, much agreement…but eleven on the shrill-o-meter cuts mileage, as I’m sure you are aware.

  30. #30 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 10:17 am

    Cav; It is near the end of the race, the tanks are full, the opposition tired, so it’s peddle to the metal until the paradigm cracks.

  31. #31 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 10:50 am

    brewski–

    What Michael Moore said was “thank you” to the people of Wisconsin for standing up for the middle class. This post is about the message, not the man.

  32. #32 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 10:55 am

    Yes, the state people who obviously have the best benefits and pensions are being paid for by the middle class working people who do not have their benefits.

    They are saying as state employees, “we do not wish to lose what you are paying for even though we know you are broke, and you will be the people from which our largess of money transfer will come from”.

    Small wonder it is not resonating. They will not get their way.

  33. #33 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 10:57 am

    Glenn wrote–

    Richard, who ponied up 700 billion to the banks?

    That would be George W. Bush, on October 4, 2008.

  34. #34 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 11:02 am

    Glenn–

    Did you watch Moore’s speech or read the post?

    “The country is awash in wealth and cash,” he said. “It’s just not in your hands.”

    This fiscal crisis can be solved easily by suspending tax cuts for the rich and corporations. But the politicians won”t do that, which is why tens of thousands of people are out protesting in the snow!

  35. #35 by Evidence on March 7, 2011 - 11:05 am

    What he says is unimportant, the man simply isn’t credible.

    What Mike is;

    “My hands are awash with cash” he said “It’s just not in your hands”

    Money that is not in your hands, is not yours, and if you compel what is not yours into your hands that is better known as theft.

  36. #36 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 11:20 am

    Richard:
    OK, so the man who cannot be named whose name appears as the first two words of the title of your top post should have said “We are all taxpayers now” or “We are all parents now”.

  37. #37 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 11:26 am

    Glenn–

    So, what do you call wealth redistribution from the middle class to rich people?

    Moore again:

    America is not broke. Not by a long shot. The country is awash in wealth and cash. It’s just that it’s not in your hands. It has been transferred, in the greatest heist in history, from the workers and consumers to the banks and the portfolios of the uber-rich.

  38. #38 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 11:28 am

    Glenn–

    It’s kinda dumb to say that because you don’t like Michael Moore his speech is wrong. That sort of argument is common I know, but it makes no logical sense.

    We are the middle class. And we’re all Wisconsinites now because the people of Wisconsin are leading the revolt of the middle class.

  39. #39 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 12:19 pm

    what do you call wealth redistribution from the middle class to rich people?

    I call it the predictable outcome of policies which flooded the US with more and more people who will work for a lower and lower wage. It’s called supply and demand.

    It’s also the result of all kinds of broken systems in our economy including health care, education, taxation, among other important factors of wealth.

  40. #40 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 12:29 pm

    brewski–

    Maybe we’re reaching one of our areas of agreement. At least you seem to think that extreme income inequality is a bad thing. It’s worse in America than in Egypt, Tunisia and Yemen, believe it or not.

    Immigration has always been one of America’s strengths. What I object to is tax policies that favor outsourcing of jobs to foreign countries.

    Another problem has been the over-growth of the financial sector (aka the big casino) to the point where it occupies 40 percent of the economy. Solid investments in infrastructure and manufacuring are not attracting enough money. I wish I knew what to do about that.

  41. #41 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 12:46 pm

    Yesterday Senator McCain made another one of his classic out-of-touch statements, claiming that iPhones and iPads are made in the USA. If they were, safety standards would be in place to protect workers.

    Once again, we see the difference between a country that has labor unions and one that doesn’t (China, in this case).

  42. #42 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 12:55 pm

    I have given my stats on my employment history before. When I was in high school and I had jobs such as fast food, dishwashing, food prep, etc. the wages that I made then adjusted for inflation would be $14-$17/hour today. The only non-apples to apples comparison with these numbers is that they were in the L.A. area and not Utah. Nevertheless, I was paid those wages because that was what the market would bear. If you add in many millions of people who are willing to work for less then it is entirely predictable that the wages for those kinds of jobs will go down. It is called supply and demand.

    Health care costs are another source of the problem. As health care costs have risen to the level that they are at least twice what they are in other countries, then of course the extra cost comes out of the wages of employees. The employer looks at the total compensation cost and what are given in benefits are taken away from potential wages.

    Obama and Geithner have spoken on the issue of the unintended consequences of our tax laws many times in the last few weeks. It is worse than how you described. It isn’t only that it can pay to hire people not in the US, it is that always pays to have profits not in the US. If it pays to shift profits from the US to Norway or Denmark, then you know something is wrong. We needed total reform in this area.

    And yes, our education can and should be a lot better and it may or may not cost more money to do so. The charge that we need to spend more money is not supported by the facts when we don’t spend any less than those countries who are kicking our butts. We just needed to do a better job spending the money that we have. Paying thousands of bad teachers to sit in “rubber rooms” in NYC is not a wise use of our money. Seniority rules do not result in the best decisions for students. Having teaching certification requirements that seem to have little to do with teaching keeps good people out of the profession. Starting foreign languages in the 7th grade or later is years later than the rest of the world. There are lots of reforms that can be done for free. There are others that will cost money.

    The answser is not in these cases that we need to stick it to the rich people more. The answer is we need to stop beating ourselves.

  43. #43 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 1:26 pm

    brewski–

    The wealthiest people in America have left the rest of us in the dust. Yet they keep demanding more and more tax breaks. Is there a moral component here?

    Many of the same people who receive the lion’s share of income in this country are implicated in the collapse of the financial sector that wiped out well over $2 trillion in home equity and cost 2.6 million jobs.

  44. #44 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 1:35 pm

    The wealthiest people in America have left the rest of us in the dust. Yet they keep demanding more and more tax breaks. Is there a moral component here?

    I’m not suggesting any “tax breaks” so I don’t what the point of your question is.

    Many of the same people who receive the lion’s share of income in this country are implicated in the collapse of the financial sector that wiped out well over $2 trillion in home equity and cost 2.6 million jobs.

    yes, and?

  45. #45 by Richard Warnick on March 7, 2011 - 1:45 pm

    brewski–

    By “stick it to the rich people,” you didn’t mean take away some of their tax breaks, like the Bush income tax cuts and the low rates on capital gains?

    And we could make them pay to help recover the economy! If Banks Paid Their Full Taxes, We Could Rehire All 132,000 Teachers Laid Off During The Recession — Twice

  46. #46 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 2:58 pm

    It isn’t about changing this break here and that break there.

    It is about making the tax code far more simple, far more rational, far easier to enforce, far easier to comply with.. and it would collect more revenue. Most importantly, it wouldnt have the unintended consequences of chasing away capital and jobs.

    I am also sure that you are aware that there is a point where raising the tax rate on capital gains would decrease revenue. You remember, the answer to the question that made Obama sound dumber than Palin.

  47. #47 by brewski on March 7, 2011 - 3:19 pm

    My latest theory is to have one tax rate an all income with one giant 0% bracket (aka standard deduction) with no other deductions.

    So all income is taxable (much of which is not taxable at all now) including long term capital gains [currently lower], life insurance proceeds [currently tax free], municipal bond interest [currently tax free], employer paid benefits [currently tax free], inheritance [avoided with life insurance], dividends [currently lower], hedge fund carried interest currently lower], etc.

    Then there is some 0% bracket perhaps $50,000 where no one pays any tax.

    Then everything else is taxed at 28%.

    No itemized deductions.

    Per your argument, this is actually a tax increase on “the wealthy” since they pay zero or lower tax rates on dividends, capital gains, muni bond interest, hedge fund carried interest, employer provided benefits, life insurance proceeds when uncle Thurston leaves them $1B in his estate-tax avoiding policy, etc. So the taxes paid by the wealthy would go way up.

    Don’t get obsessed that the nominal number is lower than the nominal rate now that they don’t actually pay.

    So why 28%?

    Because that is the rate that is about the same as all of your northern European countries you admire so much with their low Gini indexes.

  48. #48 by James Farmer on March 7, 2011 - 4:15 pm

    brew:

    Can’t say I much disagree with your proposal. So long as the rich start paying their fair share, then I am all for it.

  49. #49 by cav on March 7, 2011 - 5:18 pm

    Without a plethora of loopholes and blind alleys, it’ll never fly.

  50. #50 by Larry Bergan on March 7, 2011 - 10:25 pm

    I think it’s interesting that you never hear about class warfare any more.

    My take is that it’s now become obvious who started and won that particular war.

  51. #51 by Richard Warnick on March 9, 2011 - 6:27 pm

    Breaking–

    Republicans resorted to an illegal tactic to strip worker rights in Wisconsin. Can you say “banana republic”?

  52. #52 by Larry Bergan on March 9, 2011 - 7:10 pm

    Close your eye’s brewski.

    Michael Moore will appear tonight on the Rachel Maddow Show.

  53. #53 by cav on March 9, 2011 - 8:49 pm

    Richard,

    Redefine the union-busting as “non-budgetary”, and pass it with a simple majority. Is there anything the Rs like better than redefining things so they get their way? besides goat-blowing, I mean… Still, trying to foment something they can throw some muscle at – just to show they have some, is really so stupid.

  54. #54 by brewski on March 9, 2011 - 8:55 pm

    Elections have consequences.

    Blame it all on Pelosi.

  55. #55 by Larry Bergan on March 9, 2011 - 8:58 pm

    Is there anything the Rs like better than redefining things so they get their way?

    Nope!

  56. #56 by cav on March 9, 2011 - 9:13 pm

    Pelosi did it. Mind numbing!

  57. #57 by Richard Warnick on March 9, 2011 - 9:40 pm

    brewski–

    When you say “elections have consequences,” I think it’s shorthand for:

    (1) Republicans crashed the economy, and millions of Americans lost their jobs and homes. The outgoing Bush administration left the country mired in two unpopular, unwinnable, mind-blowingly expensive foreign occupations.

    (2) Dems failed to fix much of anything in less than two years. Republicans obstructed to the max. Unemployment soared above 9 percent when the too-small Recovery Act failed to save enough jobs. Demoralized Obama supporters didn’t go to the polls.

    (3) Panicky voters made the mistake of voting for Republicans again, after they talked about “jobs jobs jobs” and made disingenuous promises to save Medicare and Social Security. Not a word about their real agenda.

    (4) After the election, what was the first thing on the to-do list? More tax cuts for the rich. Which Americans opposed. And more corporate giveaways. Dems caved.

    (5) When the new Congress got started, predictably the GOP was all concerned about the deficit — which was caused by tax cuts for the rich, the crashed economy, corporate giveaways, and ridiculously expensive overseas military operations. They are saying the only possible solution is to take away what little working people have left, ostensibly to reduce the deficit. The real agenda is to destroy the middle class.

    (6) And the consequence is… tens of thousands of people in the streets. Tonight they are pounding on the windows and doors of the Wisconsin State Capitol. On Friday, there will be a nationwide walkout of high school students. It’s the beginning of something really big. A big guy from Michigan whose initials are M.M. said it’s one person one vote, and there are a hell of a lot more of us than there are of them!

  58. #58 by brewski on March 9, 2011 - 10:04 pm

    No.

    It is shorthand for:

    1) We saw what Dems do when they had a virtual oligarchy of the House, Senate and WH

    2) Dems had an opportunity to live up to 1% of their promises in 2006 and 2008

    3) They didn’t do squat

    4) People who don’t have pension plans to retire at 55 don’t like paying for other people who do

    5) WI is more than just Madison, a town which lives entirely on the taxpayers’ largesse

    6) FDR was right

    7) People who have degrees in “public policy” and have never had a real job in their lives have no fucking idea what they are talking about.

  59. #59 by Richard Warnick on March 9, 2011 - 10:13 pm

    Apparently we partly agree on the meaning of “elections have consequences.” The Dems didn’t do what had to be done when they had the power to do it, and they deserved to lose last year. But the GOP didn’t run on their real agenda, either.

  60. #60 by Larry Bergan on March 9, 2011 - 10:37 pm

    Well, (you know me), either elections have consequences or stolen elections have consequences.

    Does somebody want to tell me how THIS guy won with a background like THIS:

    Even Pat Buchanan didn’t think the Floridians were weird enough to vote for himself. What the crap!

  61. #61 by cav on March 10, 2011 - 12:45 am

    So when the Dems took over, what were the consequence the GOP went along with? When Obama with his giant fucking mandate and unprecedented turnout, how did those same GOP dickweeds embody the “elections have consequences” value they so cherish. Each and every time one of those or any other asshole says that they need to be berated, scoffed at, and beaten upon.

  62. #62 by Evidence on March 10, 2011 - 7:03 am

    Who you elect has consequences. The progressive left elected Obama, and then he sold you all out for republican favors for his real constituency, corporate america and Wall Street.

    As always blame the opposition not the traitors from within that sold out your dreams, which btw were strictly unrealistic.

  63. #63 by Evidence on March 10, 2011 - 7:18 am

    The upshot in this whole affair, is that public employees are now going to be treated like the average American employee, not even, but they get a taste of it. The average Wisconsin employee is now no longer needing to pay for the pension and benefit obligations of public employees and now has the means to define their tax burden in relation to public employees…down.

  64. #64 by cav on March 10, 2011 - 7:19 am

    Apparently there’s only one ‘real’ and it’s in the greed-headed wingnuts’ possession.

    Kill me now!

  65. #65 by cav on March 10, 2011 - 7:27 am

    I’m innovating as fast as I can, Master.

    :more progressive swill:

  66. #66 by Evidence on March 10, 2011 - 7:49 am

    :more progressive swill:….. the trough awaits with ample adherents

  67. #67 by Richard Warnick on March 10, 2011 - 9:42 am

    Karl Rove’s billionaires club (aka Crossroads GPS) is serving up right-wing swill by the barrel. Even the Cato Institute says they have gone too far, with the false claim that unionized government workers are paid 42% more than non-union workers.

  68. #68 by Evidence on March 10, 2011 - 10:12 am

    Let the feeding frenzy begin. Gone far enough will be when every dime is spoken for and there is no more.

  69. #69 by Richard Warnick on March 10, 2011 - 2:00 pm

    Michael Moore has explained it well. America is not broke, there’s lots of money. It’s just not in the people’s hands, it’s in the hands of the rich.

  70. #70 by brewski on March 10, 2011 - 2:35 pm

    Damn right! I keep checking my mailbox every day for the check the Moore is going to send to me. When is he going to share the wealth with me?

    Or is just yet another in an infinitely long list of Gulfstream liberals.
    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/15/weekinreview/ideas-trends-liberal-transit-those-democrats-and-their-private-jets.html

  71. #71 by Richard Warnick on March 10, 2011 - 2:48 pm

    I’m glad you agree with Michael Moore.

  72. #72 by brewski on March 10, 2011 - 2:54 pm

    In 2010, Megan Sampson was named an Outstanding First Year Teacher in Wisconsin. A week later, she got a layoff notice from the Milwaukee Public Schools. Why would one of the best new teachers in the state be one of the first let go? Because her collective-bargaining contract requires staffing decisions to be made based on seniority.

    Ms. Sampson got a layoff notice because the union leadership would not accept reasonable changes to their contract. Instead, they hid behind a collective-bargaining agreement that costs the taxpayers $101,091 per year for each teacher, protects a 0% contribution for health-insurance premiums, and forces schools to hire and fire based on seniority and union rules.

    My state’s budget-repair bill, which passed the Assembly on Feb. 25 and awaits a vote in the Senate, reforms this union-controlled hiring and firing process by allowing school districts to assign staff based on merit and performance. That keeps great teachers like Ms. Sampson in the classroom.
    Gov. Walker

    Note: Neither Michael Moore, Rachel Maddow nor Richard Warnick pay taxes in, vote in, nor have children in public school in Wisconsin.

  73. #73 by Larry Bergan on March 10, 2011 - 2:57 pm

    There’s a project for you brewski: start a website or, better yet, a cable channel chronicling Michael Moore’s jet travels. Think anybody cares?

    Somebody here already tried to tell you to look at the reasons some people get on jets. Mike is the only guy in the country who makes money with a REAL grassroots populist message and it just drives you guys up the wall!

    Settle down. You guys are still winning. What is the problem!

  74. #74 by brewski on March 10, 2011 - 3:05 pm

    I know why people get on private jets, drink martinis and smoke cigars and talk about how hard it is to get good help these days, while on their cell phones talking to their tax attorney trying to park their assets in a trust in Fiji. I get that.

    But not from someone who tells everyone else they need to pay more in taxes, reduce their carbon footprint, blah blah blah

  75. #75 by Larry Bergan on March 10, 2011 - 4:42 pm

    brewski said:

    I know why people get on private jets, drink martinis and smoke cigars and talk about how hard it is to get good help these days, while on their cell phones talking to their tax attorney trying to park their assets in a trust in Fiji. I get that.

    OK pal! Michael Moore might have used his publishers private jet in order to live up to his book signing commitments, but that’s all you got!

    Why did you try to throw in the martinis, cigars, and Fiji assets?

    Sometimes I have to wonder about you, man!

  76. #77 by Larry Bergan on March 10, 2011 - 5:01 pm

    Guess I don’t know how to use my “find” feature.

    Couldn’t find a reference to “Michael” or “Moore” in your Fiji trust article.

    Can you help me out?

  77. #78 by brewski on March 10, 2011 - 5:31 pm

    I didn’t say Moore used Fiji trusts. It is the Kennedy Klan.

  78. #79 by Larry Bergan on March 10, 2011 - 5:50 pm

    Thanks, I guess.

  79. #80 by brewski on March 13, 2011 - 10:34 am

    Steve Lopez is a left of center columnist with the LA Times. The LA Times is a lfet of center newspaper which hasn’t, to knowledge, endorsed any candidate for any office at level of government since Eisenhower.

    In today’s column he notes:

    I bumped into my daughter’s former teacher the other day, and she told me that after surviving several layoff threats, this time will probably be different.

    She’s relatively low in seniority and expects to lose her job.

    and

    “The best arts teachers at our school received pink slips.”

    and most importantly

    In L.A. Unified, 5,000 teachers could get whacked. And as for who stays and who goes, it will have nothing to do with quality. All that matters is seniority,

    and conclusively:

    But district officials … want students’ progress to be one factor in teachers’ evaluations, and Duffy (the union boss) … won’t give an inch on that topic.

    So what makes Steve Lopez different from other liberals? His daughter actually attends school in the LAUSD (a district I attended).

    So the definition of a conservative, is a liberal who has kids.

    And you wonder why people think of unions as the enemy? It’s because they are.

  80. #81 by Larry Bergan on March 13, 2011 - 10:58 am

    brewski:

    Sorry:

    Didn’t read your – supposedly – response.

  81. #82 by Larry Bergan on March 13, 2011 - 10:58 am

    Really didn’t!

  82. #83 by Larry Bergan on March 13, 2011 - 10:59 am

    But keep on keepin’ on, dude!

  83. #84 by cav on March 18, 2011 - 3:06 pm

    A state judge in Wisconsin has just issued a temporary restraining order blocking Gov. Scott Walker’s (R-WI) newly-passed law curtailing public employee unions, on the grounds that the GOP-controlled legislature appeared to have violated state public notice requirements when quickly passing the bill last week.

    “It seems to me the public policy behind effective enforcement of the open meeting law is so strong that it does outweigh the interest, at least at this time, which may exist in favor of sustaining the validity of the (law),” wrote Judge Maryann Sumi, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. show more show less

  84. #85 by Larry Bergan on March 18, 2011 - 7:42 pm

    The video on this post of Michael Moore in Wisconsin has gone viral, but listen to what Mike has to say about his OWN governor:

    Much attention has been paid to Wisconsin in recent weeks. Well, they got nothing on what’s going on here in Michigan. Rick Snyder is Scott Walker on steroids.

    Want to argue with him? Look at THIS:


    he has:

    * Gotten the House and Senate to pass bills giving him “Emergency Management” powers such as the ability to appoint a corporation or a CEO who could literally dissolve town governments or school boards, fire the elected officials, nullify any local law and run your local governmental entity. That company then would have the power to immediately declare all collective bargaining contracts null and void.

    I highly doubt this has been covered in the media with any semblance of emergency! Sirens should be sounding!

  85. #86 by Evidence on March 18, 2011 - 9:24 pm

    Mike’s a fat polarizing tub’o lard, so flat out he is neutralized, nobody give a hagen daaz what he says anymore. Look at the news, the fat man is big, but irrelevant.

    It’s over, the FDR protocol precedence for public employee whiners has been upheld and now again enforced.

    Get a job we don’t have to pay for fools if you want leverage!

  86. #87 by Evidence on March 18, 2011 - 9:30 pm

    …as the public is done providing for that leverage.

  87. #88 by Evidence on March 18, 2011 - 9:34 pm

    “Mike’s a fat polarizing tub’o lard”..oh, and forget say “rich non union hiring asswipe”!

  88. #89 by cav on March 18, 2011 - 9:57 pm

    …as the public is done providing for that leverage.

    Oh, but ‘they’ are precisely ‘the public’.

    Get some compassion, some empathy. Step into the light.

  89. #90 by cav on March 18, 2011 - 11:09 pm

    Trade unions are the countervailing power to large oligopolistic firms.

    Therefore, they must be stopped.

    How much money does the oligarchy need?

    At a party given by a billionaire on Shelter Island, the late Kurt Vonnegut informs his pal, the author Joseph Heller, that their host, a hedge fund manager, had made more money in a single day than Heller had earned from his wildly popular novel Catch 22 over its whole history. Heller responds, “Yes, but I have something he will never have . . . Enough.”

  90. #91 by Larry Bergan on March 19, 2011 - 12:19 am

    Great quote from Heller, cav!

    I couldn’t figure out why corporations never said a discouraging word about the health insurance industry in Obama’s defining stand. It’s a constant bane to them. They never stay with one “provider monkey on their back” for more then two years.

    Corporations never go after other corporations in public. It is an unwritten law. If you break it, you die.

    Case in point; Air America Radio.

    Does that mean corporations are unionized!

    Just a theory.

  91. #92 by Larry Bergan on March 19, 2011 - 12:26 am

    In other words, (I guess):

    You never badmouth another corporation…

    because that would be bad.

    Let Limbaugh, Hannity, O’ Reilly, and the clones badmouth the workers/hippies/working-poor non-rich on corporate radio. THAT’S the ticket!

  92. #93 by Larry Bergan on March 19, 2011 - 1:17 am

    Cartoon from BartCop:

    union stab

  93. #94 by cav on March 19, 2011 - 9:31 am

    If ‘Fracking for Subterranean Oil’ sponsors the Rachel Maddow News Hour, I have to wonder about content credibility. OTOH, neither I, nor besieged unions are fronting her, so perhaps I need to re-think some of my prejudices. What I do know is there’s very little ‘news’ from the corporate media that has much for me, since I really believe it’s scaled for the limpest among us, and often only meant to sell stuff, scare or propagandize.

    It just goes contrary to my story line. How do some pretty smart, respectable ‘greenies’ support ‘nukes’ and curse ‘solar’? (They’re deluded, of course). And of course, having my ‘puter on so much of the day inevitably leads to some pretty horrific mountain-top removal schemes. Evidence will no doubt provide some mature council shortly. TIA.

    My hammock awaits.

  94. #95 by Larry Bergan on March 19, 2011 - 8:42 pm

    Check you hammock for…

  95. #96 by cav on December 11, 2012 - 7:03 pm

    Is that more of that asshole O’keefe?

  96. #97 by cav on December 11, 2012 - 7:09 pm

    Republican anti-unionism is all about punishing the unions for donating to Democrats. If Republicans had pro-worker stances, then more union money would go their way.

    But that would mean changing course, for the better. And Republicans are not inclined to make THAT choice.

  97. #98 by Richard Warnick on December 11, 2012 - 7:24 pm

    Nobody needs unions when we have hammocks. I heard Mike Huckabee on the radio today saying the government will pay you the equivalent of $30 an hour for just sitting at home. He wouldn’t lie would he? ;-)

  98. #99 by Larry Bergan on December 11, 2012 - 7:25 pm

    Brewski:

    You keep posting union violence videos here. What, is there an outlet where you can get these videos? How do you know this wasn’t staged?

  99. #100 by Richard Warnick on December 11, 2012 - 7:29 pm

    Google Steven Crowder. That’s him in the video. He’s a right-wing wannabe actor-comedian and sometime Faux News Channel guest.

  100. #101 by Larry Bergan on December 11, 2012 - 7:30 pm

    Why doesn’t Huckabee quit his miserable job and just take the $30 an hour instead of making an ass out of himself for all future generations to ponder?

  101. #102 by Richard Warnick on December 11, 2012 - 7:32 pm

    Huckabee makes $500,000 a year telling lies.

  102. #103 by Larry Bergan on December 11, 2012 - 7:44 pm

    Actor-comedian?

    Wow, that was some funny stuff! Probably around as funny as the recent Bill O’ Reilly/Dennis Miller fest in Salt Lake.

    I almost went down there to see what sort of people would be interested in that kind of show.

    Steven Crowder seems like the kind of guy that would show up on Jerry Springer or a daytime court show – or Fox “news”, of course.

  103. #104 by Richard Warnick on December 12, 2012 - 2:28 pm

    Witness: Crowder “wasn’t going to go home until he got punched.” He provoked the incident, obviously.

    The protests were peaceful, and Michigan State Police reported a total of three arrests. And somehow every other media outlet except Faux News Channel managed to cover the story without starting a fight!

  104. #105 by cav on December 12, 2012 - 2:32 pm

    His hands are registered weapons.

  105. #106 by Larry Bergan on December 12, 2012 - 7:19 pm

    A clear case of “stand your ground” amid “right to work for less”.

    ALEC: take a bow, dudes!

(will not be published)


%d bloggers like this: