Republican Sabotage of the Affordable Care Act is (Almost) Unprecedented

Michael Tomasky:

But the sabotage is a story, too. A huge one. It’s almost without precedent in American history, and the precedent it does have includes some of the ugliest chapters in this nation’s history. It gets coverage, yes. But not nearly the coverage it deserves. As is so often the case—as with Benghazi, as with Fast and Furious, as with the IRS—the bigger scandal is on the Republican side.

What’s that precedent?

 . . . to find obstinacy like this, you have to go back, yes, to the pre-Civil War era. The tariff of 1828, the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which led to the civil war in “Bloody Kansas” and ultimately to the Civil War itself. Not  comforting thought. But it’s where we are.

The biggest story is from Politico.

Then, in the months leading up to the program’s debut, some states refused to do  anything at all to educate the public about the law. And congressional  Republicans sent so many burdensome queries to local hospitals and nonprofits  gearing up to help consumers navigate the new system face-to-face that at least  two such groups returned their federal grants and gave up the effort. When the  White House let it be known last summer that it was in talks with the National  Football League to enlist star athletes to help promote the law, the Senate’s  top two Republicans sent the league an ominous letter wondering why it would “risk damaging its inclusive and apolitical brand.” The NFL backed off.

It just gets worse and worse, Tomasky:

Now, with people trying to sign up, some Republican legislators are openly saying that they won’t permit their staffs to answer constituents’ questions about Obamacare. This is really the main job of a member of Congress, especially a House member: People call up all the time with questions about how to slice their way through the federal government’s briar patches, and you have caseworkers on duty—typically a couple in Washington and several more back home in the district regional offices—whose job is exactly that.

Purdum quoted Kansas Rep. Tim Huelskamp as saying he instructs his staff to refer callers to Kathleen Sebelius. But Huelskamp is not alone. Tennessee’s Diane Black says she doesn’t feel comfortable referring people to navigators. Utah’s Jason Chaffetz is referring people back to the administration, saying: “We know how to forward a phone call.”

I think this quote from Mother Jones says it all:

As one White House official told the Post, “You’re basically trying to build a complicated building in a war zone, because the Republicans are lobbing bombs at us.”

There’s a lot more to be said about Republican sabotage of the ACA.  But this is a good start.

,

  1. No comments yet.
(will not be published)


%d bloggers like this: